This is a great book by Clayton M. Christensen and was given to me to read by my leadership coach. He posed a simple question to me at the end of a coaching session. “What’s your end goal?”

It’s something I’ve been thinking about a lot lately and so this book came at the right time. Most of this year I have been talking for mentors who are retiring about how they find their purpose. It’s something I don’t want to lose just because I retire.

Those conversations, along with this book have challenged a few fundamentals for me.

  1. Retirement is not about stopping, it’s about re-gearing
  2. To finish well means committing to small consistent increments instead of relying on big changes in life to meet your goals. Discipline beats luck anytime.
  3. Have a clear picture of what you’re trying to achieve.

Onto the book:

I found three key ideas that I hope stick with me in this book.

Find your purpose

Christensen presents s simple framework of distilling a likeness of who you want to become, committing to the likeness by using your resources (time, energy, finances) to make it happen and finally measure what matters to your likeness.

It’s a simple business strategy framework that can be applied to life.

What motivates us

People are not motivated by money. It’s become a hygiene factor to be paid for a job, not a motivator. Instead we are motivated by other factors that give us a sense of purpose.

Understand the full cost of small decisions

In most cases the biggest problems in our lives come from a culmination of seemingly small decisions. At the time the small decisions don’t seem to have a big cost because we look at them in isolation. Over time you will always pay the full cost of your decisions so make sure you assess the full cost at each small decision juncture in life.


You can grab a copy of the book off amazon, its a great read for someone assessing the measure of their life.


You can also get a copy of my book “The Five Year Mark” which chronicles lessons I have learnt building a business to the five year mark.